Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor

Role

Campaign & Activism manager

Biography

Guy joined Global Justice Now in November 2014 to focus on the campaign against TTIP. He previously worked for the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants and before that for anti-capitalist group Globalise Resistance. He has been tear gassed in nine different countries, has uncovered a police spy and discovered his name on the construction workers' blacklist. He lives with his partner and two young sons in a housing coop in SE London.

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Latest posts

An activist's guide to surviving Lockdown #2


13 November 2020

A few tips on how to keeping ourselves healthy and effective during lockdown.

If the racist Right to Rent initiative is scrapped, could it be the end for the hostile environment?


10 January 2020

On Tuesday 14 January the government is appealing the court ruling which called to scrap or change the discriminatory Right to Rent initiative. If they lose, it could be the beginning of the end of the hostile environment.

Democracy has been kept out so far. But the Trade Bill battle is far from over


21 February 2018

Liam Fox’s Trade Bill is nearing the end of its time in the House of Commons, and so far our efforts to amend it have been frustrated. But there's a long way to go.

Tariffs, Bombardier and the dangers of dealing with Trump


05 October 2017

The recent dispute over the US slapping a 219% tariff on Bombardier made aircraft hit the headlines recently and will doubtless bubble away in the background for months to come.

Schools, hospitals and now banks - where will the 'hostile environment' end?


22 September 2017

Theresa May’s pet project of creating a 'hostile environment' towards migrants took a turn for the worse today. Home Secretary Amber Rudd announced that checks on 70 million bank accounts will start in the new year, and banks found providing banking services to irregular migrants will be penalised.

What happens next with CETA?

After the mid-February approval of CETA by the European parliament, the focus turned to Canada and the member states of the European Union who all need to ratify the deal.

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