Daniel Willis

Role

Policy and campaigns manager

Biography

Daniel joined Global Justice Now’s policy and campaigns team in 2019 and is mainly working on our aid campaign. He has a background in historical and social policy research. In 2018, Daniel completed a PhD in History and Latin American Studies at UCL, researching violent conflicting and the legacies of colonialism in Peru. Daniel has also spent time campaigning on climate justice issues and writing for several websites on Latin American politics and history.

Latest posts

Resisting Empire 2.0: why we're protesting the UK-Africa Investment Summit


16 January 2020
Aid

For many, the idea of encouraging more foreign investment in African countries make sense. This is certainly the government's hope as they approach the first UK-Africa Investment Summit, to be held in central London on Monday 20 January.

The choice is clear: we must oppose the racist Right in Bolivia


14 November 2019

On Sunday 10 November, the thirteen year tenure of Bolivian President Evo Morales ended when the army withdrew its support and called on him to resign. Protests have been ongoing in Bolivia for several weeks over a variety of concerns, including Morales' handling of fires in the Chiquitania region and allegations of electoral fraud.

Frontline communities affected by mining projects call for international solidarity against transnational corporations

Community representatives and activists from Colombia, Brazil and Chile have been in London this week to share their experiences and call for international solidarity with mining-affected communities against the power of transnational corporations.

Reimagining aid: why DfID must prioritise UN development goals over British financial interests


17 September 2019
Aid

The recent announcement by incoming Secretary of State for International Development Alok Sharma, that he will protect the UK aid budget, might be consolation to some. However, the real threat to aid is not necessarily in a cut to funding, but in the government’s continuing efforts to redefine international development. 

Amazonian communities need solidarity, not saviours

A multitude of images of burning rainforest have circulated across social media over the last week with the hashtag #PrayfortheAmazon. A familiar refrain in these tweets and posts has been: if billionaires could dig in their pockets for Notre Dame, why won’t they save the Amazon?