Alex Scrivener

Alex Scrivener

Role

Policy manager

Biography

Alex is the policy officer at Global Justice Now.

Latest posts

From ID cards to echoing the BNP – seven ways to make migrants feel unwelcome


31 July 2018

The Border Audit, a new report from the centre-right thinktank Policy Exchange was released on Monday. The authors essentially argue that the problem with the hostile environment for migrants is not that it is too tough but that it hasn’t gone far enough.

Liam Fox thinks it’s all over and absolute power over trade deals is his. Not yet, Sonny Jim


19 July 2018

He thinks he’s done it. The relief on Liam Fox’s face after his government survived a series of votes on his beloved Trade Bill relatively unscathed was clear.

If this really was all over he would have reasons to be happy. After all, as things stand the Trade Bill gives him truly intoxicating amounts of power.

Parliament was asleep at the wheel on CETA. It can’t be allowed to happen again


28 June 2018

Few people noticed but parliament just made a big mistake on trade. On Tuesday, MPs passed a motion in support of CETA – the EU-Canada trade agreement.

How Liam Fox read 60,000 comments on the trade consultation in a few hours


22 November 2017

Liam Fox must be a very fast reader. Superhuman in fact. Because just hours after the ‘consultation’ on the trade white paper closed, the government proposed a new Trade Bill.

Time for a UK agricultural policy that doesn’t subsidise the rich


05 August 2016

Let’s get one thing straight. The EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is a disaster. It is essentially a £50 billion welfare system for the landed gentry and other big landowners across Europe. While people who genuinely need public funds find their benefits cut to the bone, these people get huge amounts of public money for doing absolutely nothing.

I thought I could get away from Brexit in Outer Mongolia…. I was wrong


13 July 2016

Outer Mongolia has, like Timbuktu, always been one of those places well known (from an anglo-centric perspective) for being very far away from the UK. However, the Asia-Europe People's Forum held in Ulaanbaatar wasn't far enough away for the subject of Brexit not to be an ever-present shadow over discussions.

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