energy privatisation

Why we are campaigning on energy privatisation, and other questions

August 2015

Despite the UK’s long and unsuccessful experience with energy privatisation, our government continues to support it elsewhere – most recently in Nigeria. The UK continues to pour aid money into a privatisation programme that seems doomed to failure, neglecting policy options that could address Nigeria’s serious energy supply problems.

Here are some commonly asked questions about our campaign on energy privatisation.

‘It’s a story of corruption, greed and ineptitude’ - UK aid and Nigeria's energy privatisation

Sitting in the Oxford sunshine, Ken Henshaw is telling me how proud he is of the solar panel on his Port Harcourt house. ‘In Nigeria, you are your own government and energy company!’ he jokes, describing the lengths to which he has gone to connect his home to a power source. He also had to buy a pump to access clean water, and runs his own sewage system.

No answers on Nigerian energy privatisation

Last week we were excited to host Nigerian energy activist, Ken Henshaw, in the UK. Ken is from the Niger Delta region and so has long been involved in struggles against the corporate control of oil resources in this part of Nigeria.

Power to the people, not the private sector

Nigerians have been blackmailed into believing that there was no solution to the electricity challenges without privatisation. Politicians have sold off electricity infrastructure to their friends for ridiculously small amounts of money, spent huge amounts of public funds in a questionable fashion and laid off thousands of workers.

Why the Daily Mail is right that aid money is wasted, but wrong that we must reduce it


13 April 2015

The Daily Mail is right to be scandalised that more than £1 billion of the aid budget ends up in British and American private consultancy firms. But for Global Justice Now, our solution is quite different from that put forward by the Mail.

Resource thumbail

Privatising power: UK aid funds energy privatisation in Nigeria

March 2015

Despite its vast oil wealth, over half of Nigerians lack access to electricity, and the country’s grid power usage per person is among the lowest in the world, meaning that many people rely on candles and kerosene, or expensive diesel generators. Lack of electricity hampers the provision of public services like healthcare and education, and makes it difficult or impossible for businesses to operate efficiently. As a result, Nigeria relies on imports for most of its manufactured goods. So it is clear that change is urgently needed to Nigeria’s energy system.

Resource thumbail

10 reasons why energy privatisation fails

January 2015

One in five people globally live without electricity because they are unable to access it and millions more go without because they cannot afford to pay for it. Even in the UK, people are forced to choose between feeding their families and paying their energy bills.

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‘It’s a story of corruption, greed and ineptitude’ - UK aid and Nigeria's energy privatisation

Sitting in the Oxford sunshine, Ken Henshaw is telling me how proud he is of the solar panel on his Port Harcourt house. ‘In Nigeria, you are your own government and energy company!’ he jokes, describing the lengths to which he has gone to connect his home to a power source. He also had to buy a pump to access clean water, and runs his own sewage system.

No answers on Nigerian energy privatisation

Last week we were excited to host Nigerian energy activist, Ken Henshaw, in the UK. Ken is from the Niger Delta region and so has long been involved in struggles against the corporate control of oil resources in this part of Nigeria.

Power to the people, not the private sector

Nigerians have been blackmailed into believing that there was no solution to the electricity challenges without privatisation. Politicians have sold off electricity infrastructure to their friends for ridiculously small amounts of money, spent huge amounts of public funds in a questionable fashion and laid off thousands of workers.

Why the Daily Mail is right that aid money is wasted, but wrong that we must reduce it


13 April 2015

The Daily Mail is right to be scandalised that more than £1 billion of the aid budget ends up in British and American private consultancy firms. But for Global Justice Now, our solution is quite different from that put forward by the Mail.

Resources

Why we are campaigning on energy privatisation, and other questions

August 2015

Despite the UK’s long and unsuccessful experience with energy privatisation, our government continues to support it elsewhere – most recently in Nigeria. The UK continues to pour aid money into a privatisation programme that seems doomed to failure, neglecting policy options that could address Nigeria’s serious energy supply problems.

Here are some commonly asked questions about our campaign on energy privatisation.

Resource thumbail

Privatising power: UK aid funds energy privatisation in Nigeria

March 2015

Despite its vast oil wealth, over half of Nigerians lack access to electricity, and the country’s grid power usage per person is among the lowest in the world, meaning that many people rely on candles and kerosene, or expensive diesel generators. Lack of electricity hampers the provision of public services like healthcare and education, and makes it difficult or impossible for businesses to operate efficiently. As a result, Nigeria relies on imports for most of its manufactured goods. So it is clear that change is urgently needed to Nigeria’s energy system.

Resource thumbail

10 reasons why energy privatisation fails

January 2015

One in five people globally live without electricity because they are unable to access it and millions more go without because they cannot afford to pay for it. Even in the UK, people are forced to choose between feeding their families and paying their energy bills.

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