Resources

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The future of aid after DfID: Shocking development projects supported by the UK

July 2020

With the government having recently announced plans to abolish the Department for International Development (DfID) and give control of UK aid policy to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), many are wondering how the change is likely to affect the type of projects that receive development funds in the future.

Aid
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Decarbonising aid: why the UK must end its overseas fossil fuel financing before COP26

June 2020

Under the terms of the Paris Agreement, signed April 2016, the UK government committed to making global financial flows "consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development". Despite this, the UK continues to provide high amounts of finance for fossil fuel infrastructure overseas using the international development budget and UK Export Finance (UKEF) credits to UK businesses and exporters. 

Aid
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Exiting the permanent crisis in the global south

April 2020

The case for a global financial reset in the wake of Covid-19 

Even in the wealthiest countries on earth, years of austerity combined with ‘market knows best’ ideology has hollowed out our ability to deal with coronavirus. But for many countries in the global south, the weakness of the public sector was not a democratic choice but was imposed by rich countries and international institutions like the IMF...

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Doing more harm than good: Why CDC must reform for people and planet

February 2020

This report details the failures of the government’s development bank, CDC, to invest in a just and responsible way. Despite a series of reforms and promises to change, CDC continues to invest heavily in unaccountable private equity funds around the world, giving money to projects with dubious development impact to make a high rate of return.

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Briefing: Making CDC work for people and planet

November 2019

This briefing highlights some of the major problems with the CDC and the projects it funds. We believe that these problems are not aberrations but are a product of the type of organisation CDC is. CDC needs a new, legally-binding mandate which commits it to reducing poverty, closing global inequalities, doing no harm to the climate and facilitating a just, green transition to renewable energy as its driving objectives, for which its board can be held legally accountable. We propose that CDC should be transformed into an international Green Investment Bank, with the ability to lend to local and national governments in developing countries, and with other donors who share this reformed vision being invited to contribute to its finance and governance.

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