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Global Justice Now returned to court today to challenge Boris Johnson’s government to release details of secret trade talks held with at least 21 countries including the USA, China, Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

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Responding to today’s story in the Financial Times (1), which states that Boris Johnson is “planning to fold the UK’s Department for International Development into the Foreign Office if he wins this week’s election”, Daniel Willis (Policy & Campaigns Manager at Global Justice Now), said:

“These reports will be no surprise to those who have witnessed the Conservatives’ increasing attempts to redirect aid towards supporting British economic interests since the Brexit vote." 

Campaigners will challenge the Department for International Trade in court on Thursday 12 December over its failure to release full details of dozens of post-Brexit trade talks. The papers, including the redacted minutes of US-UK negotiations which have become a major political issue during the general election, were released to campaign group Global Justice Now in heavily redacted form earlier this year. But campaigners claim the blacked out documents are an affront to democracy, arguing that the far-reaching implications of trade deals today necessitate high levels of transparency and scrutiny which the government is blocking.

A Global Justice Now spokesperson said:

“The leak of the Trump Trade Files has revealed the threat to NHS drug prices, to food standards and to our democracy itself from a US-UK trade deal. Wherever the leak came from, no one has disputed that the documents are real. They are information, not disinformation.

"Voters can now clearly see what the Conservative government has been willing to put on the table in these trade talks, and will be able to make an informed choice on 12 December.”

NHS nurses and doctors will lead the march against Donald Trump's visit to Britain on Tuesday 3 December, as concerns about the threat to the NHS from a trade deal with Trump’s USA intensify. In the wake of last week’s leaked papers from US-UK trade talks, thousands of campaigners will brave the cold to protest outside the Buckingham Palace banquet where Trump will dine tomorrow evening. Crowds will be addressed by doctors, climate change campaigners, anti-war activists and musician Brian Eno.
 

Documents have been leaked from six rounds of trade talks between the US and the UK. We look at what the documents say and what it means.

Trade campaigners have welcomed the release of leaked papers detailing trade talks between the Trump administration and British government officials, which show the US government pushing Britain into as hard a Brexit as possible because they see this as the best way of benefitting the US economy. This comes at the expense of standards, protections and livelihoods in Britain.

Minister pledges to ‘walk away’ from US trade deal if it means higher drug prices, but government still refusing to release documents which might prove otherwise

Donald Trump arrives in the week before election day and the Stop Trump Coalition, which organised the huge protests against Trump’s visits in July 2018 and June this year, will be out on the streets again on Tuesday 3 December.

Campaign group Global Justice Now today called on Prime Minister Boris Johnson to order the release of multiple documents, dubbed the ‘Trump Trade Files’, relating to trade talks between the UK government and the Trump administration, in advance of the general election on 12 December, so that the electorate can be properly informed on the government’s plans for post-Brexit trade.

After a four-year long fight campaigners and patient activists welcome the news this morning that the cystic fibrosis drugs, Orkambi and Symkevi will be made available under the NHS to patients in England. But this protracted price negotiation between the government and Orkambi manufacturer Vertex proves that a system that prioritises private profits over patients needs fundamental change.

 

Aid

Our response to today’s ICAI report on UK aid and the government’s ‘mutual prosperity’ agenda,

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