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As MPs finally get to debate CETA, the EU-Canada trade deal, in parliament today, civil society groups warn this toxic trade deal threatens our democracy and public services, calling on MPs to reject it.

Trade deals with US and others could undermine devolution. Campaigners demand a voice in trade for Welsh Assembly

A new briefing released today warns that the power of ‘Big Tech’ corporations like Google, Amazon, and Facebook pose a serious threat to the fight against global poverty and inequality.

Migrant solidarity campaigners this morning blocked the entrance to the Home Office in Westminster to demand the government puts a stop to its hostile environment policy towards immigrants, following the resignation of Home Secretary Amber Rudd.

Global Justice Now welcomes plans for mass protests against the visit of US President Donald Trump to the UK in July, and rejects warnings that a hostile reception could harm a US-UK trade deal.

Opinion poll finds that 88% of North Somerset consituents oppose US food standards being imported, and 63% oppose offering US corporations access to NHS.

Aid

In response to development secretary Penny Mordaunt's launch of an overhaul of British aid today, Global Justice Now has warned that such a strategy is based on outdated ideas of trickle-down economics and risks future financial crises across African and Asian countries.

Campaign group Global Justice Now has criticised the lack of transparency over totemic US-UK trade talks, after the UK’s Department for International Trade and the Office of the United States Trade Representative today released a cursory statement on the latest talks, more than two weeks after they took place. 

Aid

Campaign group calls for closure of programme funding human rights-abusing security forces

Campaign group Global Justice Now has commended the Labour Party on its new development policy, released today, saying it represents a long overdue recognition that charity can never make up for the damage that Western corporations, finance and foreign policy have caused in the world.

Campaigners urge parliament to take control of trade policy, as secretive US-UK trade talks resume tomorrow in Washington.

Liam Fox’s mission to Washington DC appeared to end in failure yesterday, as no progress was made in his attempt to be granted an exemption to Donald Trump’s steel tariffs. Having labelled the tariffs "absurd" on BBC Question Time last week and boasted they were the reason for his trip to Washington, Fox's statement on the talks consigned the issue to a virtual footnote.

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