How I got involved with Global Justice Now – and why you should too


16 August 2018

I first became interested in Global Justice Now during the summer of my final year of secondary school, as I believed in social justice and in creating a fairer world. I had been bullied and left my final year with fragility and promised myself I would help those burdened to pursue a voice, I desired to make a change, to mould the surroundings around me.

During the summer I contacted my local group through email and heard back a few weeks later from Chris Manly, who told me to visit a local stall the group was holding at the Elder Stubbs Festival. I made my way to their stall at Florence Park, where I was greeted with postcards, leaflets and stickers as well as a game of Monopoly. Having taken a badge, I pinned it to the collar of my lapel and then proceeded to ask more about the group. Chris eagerly told me that the group holds meetings every second Tuesday of the month at the Town Hall and was interested in taking younger members. I signed a few petitions and left with awe.

Last September I attended my first Global Justice meeting, I remember being nervous at first, I was early and decided to sit upon the cabinet which was tucked away in the corner of the room, and as the clock chimed from St Matins Tower, more and more people walked in, each adorned with a smile. The fear I held quickly dissipated as we introduced ourselves I realised I was sitting in a room with people who sought to kindle change.

From that meeting onwards, I have attended almost all of the sessions. Every session had captured my imagination. in February a meeting was held with Anneliese Dodd’s, MP for Oxford East; I had the opportunities to volunteer at the Green Fair held in December and the One World Fair in November. More recently I helped out at a stall during Leamington peace Festival, it was the first time that I had held the confidence to speak to the public about our campaigns. I met Sandra, from the Head office, who had dressed up as Trump, waving plastic chickens in the gentle wind, as we collected signatures for a pledge to march at the Stop Trump Carnival of Resistance on the 13th of July. The evening was memorable as I chanced conversations, spoke to fervent individuals and become closer to my local group. At the end of that Saturday, Sandra had given me the opportunity to visit the Head office which I was ardent to take.

As summer rolled by, I had my first work experience at Global Justice Now, which has been incredible. Tucked behind buildings of Brixton and mottled with roadwork’s the building stands tall. As I walked in I was scared, but was greeted warmly by Steven, found Sandra and met Sam, who I would shadow. During my first three days in the office I have sat in various meetings, become slightly lost in Brixton whilst trying to find an art shop in an attempt to repair the Trump head, and have written articles.

My experience as a young person who has joined Global Justice Now has been astounding, the people are warm and receptive. I would encourage you to join your local group.

Anisah Rokib is a youth member based in Oxford where she’s currently studying for her A-levels. She wrote this blog during her work experience with us in August.

Blog

The global south is being left at the mercy of the financial markets. We must keep campaigning to prevent a full-blown debt crisis


23 July 2020

While lockdown is easing here in Britain, across the world coronavirus cases continue to rise. In some countries, like El Salvador, health systems have been overwhelmed. In others, including parts of India, strict lockdowns have had to be reimposed in parts of the country. Across Africa, infections are rising rapidly.

The G20 continues to ignore calls to cancel the debts of the world’s poorest countries and stop funding fossil fuels

When the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared Covid-19 a global pandemic in March, it meant understanding that no one is safe unless everyone is safe. To fight against its spread, it's in everyone’s interest to bring the pandemic under control.

4 reasons we should be worried about big pharma's grip over publicly funded Covid-19 vaccines

Here are four reasons why we should be worried about big pharma’s grip over this publicly funded vaccine.