Phulbari day of action

A group of Bangladeshi activists contacted Global Justice Now in 2008 to stand with them in their struggle against plans for a UK backed mine that was to built in Phulbari, Bangladesh.  If the proposal for the mine went ahead it would displace 130,000 people, contaminate the water supply of hundreds of thousands and destroyed fertile land.  Thousands of Global Justice Now supporters took action against the mine and thanks to persistent and brave campaigning by the Bangladeshi community and support from across the globe the mine has still not been built yet. But not without great cost; on 26 August 2006 a protest against the mine in Phulbari led to clashes with the paramilitary which left three protestors dead and many more injured.

The anniversary of this event is marked every year by ‘Phulbari Day’. This year is the tenth anniversary and we, the global community, have been invited to join our Bangladeshi friends in London as they commemorate the events of 2006 and celebrate a decade of resistance against the mine.  There will be a rally outside the London Stock Exchange at 11am on Friday 26 August, asking for GCM plc, the UK company that plan to build the mine, to be delisted. If you can make it please wear red, black or blue and bring  any loud instruments you may have plus any placards! Organisational banners are also welcome.

For more details please click here.

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