Afrikan Emancipation Day Reparations March


02 August 2016

Hundreds of people took part in the third annual Afrikan Emancipation Day Reparations March yesterday as part of a campaign calling for the UK to make amends for the enslavement endured by generations of African people.

The third annual Afrikan Emancipation Day Reparations March took place from Brixton to Parliament Square calling for reparations to be made for slavery.

Organisers carried a petition from Brixton to Parliament Square demanding the government acknowledges the historic and ongoing impact of colonisation and slavery.

The petition states that ‘the blood, sweat and tears of our Ancestors financed the economic expansion of the United Kingdom. Therefore it is just and fair that reparations be made to their offspring including measures of restitution, compensation, rehabilitation satisfaction, guarantees of non-repetition according to the tenets of international human, humanitarian and people’s rights law’.

And calls for the establishment of  an All-Party Parliamentary Commission of Inquiry for Truth & Reparatory JusticeMore information on the petition can be found on at https://stopthemaangamizi.com/petition/

Photo by: Thabo Jaiyesimi

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