Barclays, stop bankrolling coal!


24 April 2014

This morning a few of my colleagues and I went to protest against Barclays at its AGM. Since 2005 Barclays has invested more than £3.1 billion in dirty coal projects that are destroying the environment and propelling climate change.


WDM has revealed that Barclays invested £127 million in mining company Bumi Resources, responsible for destroying rainforest and evicting Indonesian communities from their land.
 



We were joined by Paul Corbit Brown from Keepers of the Mountains who are working to stop ‘mountain top removal’ coal mining, a highly destructive method that has already caused health problems and poisoned water supplies where it has been used. Barclays is the world’s biggest bankroller of mountaintop removal coal mining.

Barclays has now agreed to meet with Paul to discuss mountain top removal mining. So it’s now more urgent than ever that we keep up the pressure on Barclays to stop bankrolling coal.

You can email Barclays' CEO to tell him to stop bankrolling coal.

 A short videoclip from the protest:

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