Nestle's fair trade four fingered Kit Kat.


07 December 2009

This morning it's been announced that Nestle will be gaining the Fair Trade mark for its four-fingered Kit Kat.


Although the World Development Movement is pleased that some small farmers in the Cote d'Ivoire will earn a little more as a result of Nestle's four-fingered, Kit Kat's move to Fairtrade, this is a long way from achieving trade justice.


It must be put into perspective: the Fairtrade mark only applies to sales of Kit Kat's four-finger bars in the first instance - and the premium represents less than one per cent of their Kit Kat sales. We won't be satisfied until we see a deeper transformation of their business model, not just in cocoa for one product, but for all products. Nestle's current model is based on paying farmers in the developing world a pittance whilst the company rakes in hundreds of millions of pounds of profits every year.


Nestle holds a staggering amount of power in the UK confectionery market, and the use of the Fairtrade label should not distract attention from Nestle's continued lobbying against any reforms to the unfair trade rules that keep the price of cocoa low.


With Fairtrade products now firmly established in the market, all of us in the Fairtrade movement should now raise our game by pushing for political action to ensure farmers in the Cote d'Ivoire and all around the world receive a fair price for all their produce.


 


 


 

Tags:

Blog

Coronavirus is killing the poor far more than the rich. A vaccine must be free for everyone

Pneumonia is killing 2,000 people every day. But not because of coronavirus. For nearly twenty years, millions of children have not had access to the patented vaccine manufactured by Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline due to its high cost, which has generated billions in profit for those corporations.

Our online fundraiser to support displaced communities in Calais proves social distancing doesn't mean social apathy


13 May 2020

On Wednesday 6 May, Our Future Now (OFN) held an online fundraiser in support of the work of Calais Food Collective (CFC), an organisation providing essential food services for displaced communities in Calais and Dunkirk in France. Over 2000 refugees from various war-torn places are currently displaced in Northern France, and have found themselves in a perpetual state of uncertainty and marginalisation as European countries reject their claims to asylum.

Where the pandemic isn’t (yet) the virus: fearing illness and destitution in Lesotho

Every morning, Google Alerts connects me to news coverage of Lesotho, a small southern African country that I’ve visited regularly since the mid-1990s. Over the past couple of months, the new lexicon of social distancing, lock-down, PCR testing kits and PPE shortages has threaded through the nation’s press, a striking reminder that the coronavirus pandemic is truly global.