Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects. Views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of Global Justice Now. 

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from trade justice and climate change to migration and aid.

Latest posts

Scotland: Good Food Nation or Fast Food Nation?

 

The politics of food is maturing in Scotland, with progressive proposals for a 'right to food' and for Scotland to become a 'good food nation'. But the UK government's plans for a post Brexit internal market across the four nations of the UK, plus a trade deal with the US, could threaten these positive moves towards healthy, sustainably produced food. 

Beware the rose-tinted spectacles and don’t bank on a fossil free COP26 just yet

Reports that the UK government may not accept sponsorship from fossil fuel corporations are falsely optimistic.

The glass is still half full: the second revised draft of the negotiation text for the UN treaty on transnational corporations and human rights

The United Nations’ (UN) process of creating a Legally Binding Instrument (LBI) to regulate the activities of transnational corporations (TNCs) and other business enterprises reached another stage on 6 August in the publication of the 

How trade deals are fuelling climate breakdown

The US-UK trade deal isn’t just a threat to our food standards and public services, it’s also a threat to our world. The whole model of corporate globalisation that drives international trade today is a major cause of climate breakdown. At Global Justice Now, we see campaigning on trade and climate as interconnected.

The global south is being left at the mercy of the financial markets. We must keep campaigning to prevent a full-blown debt crisis


23 July 2020

While lockdown is easing here in Britain, across the world coronavirus cases continue to rise. In some countries, like El Salvador, health systems have been overwhelmed. In others, including parts of India, strict lockdowns have had to be reimposed in parts of the country. Across Africa, infections are rising rapidly.

The G20 continues to ignore calls to cancel the debts of the world’s poorest countries and stop funding fossil fuels

When the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared Covid-19 a global pandemic in March, it meant understanding that no one is safe unless everyone is safe. To fight against its spread, it's in everyone’s interest to bring the pandemic under control.

4 reasons we should be worried about big pharma's grip over publicly funded Covid-19 vaccines

Here are four reasons why we should be worried about big pharma’s grip over this publicly funded vaccine.

#StopAidForProfit - ten shocking corporate projects supported by UK aid


20 July 2020
Aid

Boris Johnson's announcement that DfID will abolished later this year has left many in the development sector with more questions than answers. But if previous experiences of "tied aid" and spending by CDC Group are anything to go by, the future of aid will see more money being shovelled into corporate pockets.

$2,340 for a Covid-19 treatment?

Yesterday US pharmaceutical company, Gilead announced that they will charge an extraordinary $2,340 for a five-day treatment course for the drug remdesivir, which is being used as a treatment for Covid-19. The drug has been developed with substantial amounts of public money in the US, with a reported $70.5 million of public investment

South African movements are building a Climate Justice Charter from below

Despite a temporary dip in carbon emissions due to the coronavirus pandemic, scientific calculations shows that it is highly likely that 2020 will still be the world’s hottest year on record.

6 ways to mark Windrush Day and challenge the racist hostile environment

Today is Windrush Day, marking the day 72 years ago when the Empire Windrush ship arrived at Tilbury Docks and gave its name to a generation of migrants from the Caribbean. It’s a day of celebration – but also necessarily a day of confronting injustice. Here's a reminder of why and how we can re-commit to demanding justice for the Windrush generation and demanding an end to the hostile environment for migrants, once and for all. 

My week at the Black Lives Matter protests

I had a bit of a moral conundrum over attending last week’s Black Lives Matter protests. How responsible was it to attend a mass gathering during a pandemic disproportionately affecting the BAME community and other minority groups? Ultimately I decided it was too important to sit out, particularly for those of us with the privilege of being able to make that choice.  The week wasan important reminder of the solidarity and empowerment many of us feel - maybe uniquely - at protests. Not to mention the work that we must all be doing to support an anti-racist movement.

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