Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects. Views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of Global Justice Now. 

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from trade justice and climate change to migration and aid.

Latest posts

Peruvian protestors are facing police violence while standing up for democracy


15 November 2020

Reports suggest that protestors across Peru have been met with police violence as they demonstrate against the removal of President Martín Vizcarra by Congress. This is the latest in a series of attempted power grabs by parties in Peru's Congress with worrying implications for the upcoming Presidential elections in 2021.

What will a Biden administration mean for the climate?

Many celebrated the electoral defeat of Donald Trump, danced in the streets and cried with tears of joy. For those from the progressive movements, it was a hard-earned victory born out of their collective power and strong political will to confront white supremacy and fascism. 

An activist's guide to surviving Lockdown #2


13 November 2020

A few tips on how to keeping ourselves healthy and effective during lockdown.

The government still says 'trust us' on chlorinated chicken. We don't.


02 November 2020

The pressure is working. This weekend, government ministers performed a U-turn and announced concessions on food standards in future trade deals.

Halloween quiz: US trade deal - trick or treat?


29 October 2020

Dare to take our Halloween quiz to reveal the horrors that might lie beneath the UK government's trade deal with the US...

The fight for racial justice in the present requires an understanding of our past. It's time to #TeachRaceMigrationEmpire


23 October 2020

Transforming how we’re taught about the past is one of the key demands in the UK following the Black Lives Matter protests. This is what needs to change.

A trade deal with the US could lower standards for cosmetics, toys and many other consumer products


22 October 2020

The risks from a trade deal with the US are not limited to chlorinated chicken and hormone-pumped beef.  A US-UK trade deal could also result in the import of lower quality consumer products from the US containing chemicals currently banned or restricted in the UK.

Full list of MPs who failed to protect food standards in the Agriculture Bill

Last night MPs voted by a majority of 53 to remove an amendment from the Agriculture Bill that would have protected British farmers and food standards in future trade deals like the one with the United States.

 

We can defeat the US trade deal, whoever is in the White House


08 October 2020

This November, the US presidential election offers Americans a stark choice. Yet while the rest of us don’t get even get that choice, we will surely be affected by the results. On the most basic level, Trump’s rejection of multilateralism makes the world a more dangerous place. Pulling funding for the World Health Organisation in the middle of a pandemic is a case in point.

The government is moving closer to ending its overseas fossil fuel support

Time after time, the role of UK public finance institutions in fueling the climate emergency overseas has been exposed. Sustained civil society pressure has pushed the prime minister close to major announcement, but loopholes still remain.

Scotland: Good Food Nation or Fast Food Nation?

 

The politics of food is maturing in Scotland, with progressive proposals for a 'right to food' and for Scotland to become a 'good food nation'. But the UK government's plans for a post Brexit internal market across the four nations of the UK, plus a trade deal with the US, could threaten these positive moves towards healthy, sustainably produced food. 

Beware the rose-tinted spectacles and don’t bank on a fossil free COP26 just yet

Reports that the UK government may not accept sponsorship from fossil fuel corporations are falsely optimistic.

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