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Is the UK trying to delay its pledge to dump dirty development?

The UK government has just launched a new consultation on how to stop funding fossil fuel projects in the global south. We need your help to send them a clear message: dump dirty development immediately, and dump it for good.

The ‘Post-Trump Systemic Disorder’ we will continue to live in

Hundreds of millions of viewers yesterday watched the live coverage of Air Force One, which took Donald Trump on his last flight as US president from the Joint Base Andrews military facility in Maryland to his massive Mar-a-Lago estate, his post-presidential permanent home in Florida.

The government’s trade agenda threatens disastrous deregulation – but we can stop it


15 January 2021

The Brexit trade deal with the EU might be completed, but the type of country Britain becomes next is still to be defined - and trade rules will play a key role in shaping our future. That’s why we need to keep campaigning on trade in the months and years ahead.  

Latest news

“As cases spread, mutations will continue to manifest and threaten all of our efforts to contain this disease. The unfair patent system is now one the biggest obstacles to defeating this virus.”

Campaigners have said it is “deeply alarming” that South Africa is reportedly being charged nearly 2.5 times the price paid by most European countries for Oxford-AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine, claiming such inequality is now a core obstacle to controlling coronavirus.[1]

“This gives Johnson a blank cheque to sign toxic trade deals which threaten public services and food standards” say campaigners

MPs rejected amendments to the Trade Bill this afternoon which would have:

  •  Guaranteed MPs a vote on trade deals
  •  Protected the NHS, food, animal welfare and environment standards
  •  Prevented trade deals with countries engaged in acts of genocide or serious human rights violations

The ‘ping-pong' process will continue as the Bill now returns to the Lords.

New research released today by Global Justice Now examines the history of some of the leading corporations producing coronavirus medicines, warning that their business model is likely to make controlling the pandemic more difficult, despite the rapid production of vaccines.