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Humanity isn't a disease - but ecofascism is

Since coronavirus hit Europe, ideas about this destructive pandemic, which has killed thousands, as the ‘cure’ for environmental damage have been circulating. On stickers, Instagram graphics and viral Tweets, across the internet people are trying to ‘look on the bright side’ of Covid-19 by claiming that if the human population were to drop or people were to stop consuming, that would solve global warming. This idea is dangerously wrong, and it’s not new.

Covid-19: the spectre of an Africa unprepared for health crises


31 March 2020

On March 29, 2020, African Center for Disease Control (CDC) had reported a total of 4,282 cases, 134 deaths, and 302 recoveries from Covid-19. 46 out of 54 countries have been affected since the first case reported on the continent in Egypt on February 15. Africa is almost closed by Covid-19 and the situation is almost similar to the first month of invasion of the pandemic in Europe.

Women’s activism in the time of climate and other emergencies

We are facing a climate emergency, a possible economic recession, and now a global pandemic that will test the limits of our health systems and expose the short-sightedness of our governments and their skewed priorities.

Latest news

Aid

A documentary by the BBC’s award-winning Africa Eye team, aired yesterday, has reported on concerns of alleged fraud, bribery and other highly questionable business practices by two British managers appointed by a UK aid-backed private equity fund to run its investee Kenyan firm Spencon.

A group of charities and campaigning groups has written to the government today, calling on them to halt trade negotiations with the United States to focus instead on the health and economic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

The letter was sent following comments made by the United States Trade Representative on Monday 23 March 2020 in which he confirmed that “both the United States and the United Kingdom are committed to starting trade negotiations as soon as possible”.

Only the most radical reset, akin to a post-world war overhaul of the international economy, will allow us to rebuild the international economy in a way which means we can tackle future pandemics.