Nick Dearden

Nick Dearden, photo by Genevieve Stevenson




As director, Nick manages the staff team and resources on behalf of Global Justice Now's members. He is also the public face of the organisation. Nick started his career at War on Want where he became a senior campaigner. He went on to be corporates campaign manager at Amnesty International UK. As director of the Jubilee Debt Campaign, he built strong relationships with campaigners in the global south. He helped win a new law to stop Vulture Funds from using UK courts to squeeze huge debt payments out of poor countries. Nick joined Global Justice Now in September 2013.

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Latest posts

Why we must stand with Greece

19 June 2015

In fighting against the most brutal austerity in Europe, the Greek people are engaged in a epic battle for the future of European democracy. All anti-poverty campaigners must stand with them.

The great TTIP debate that never was

10 June 2015

Is TTIP now on the ropes? The US-EU trade deal known as TTIP is being dealt weekly setbacks at the moment, culminating in angry scenes in the European parliament this morning.

Are the wheels starting to fall off TTIP?

13 May 2015

In a shock vote for President Obama yesterday, the Senate blocked a bill that would have allowed him to 'fast track' trade agreements like TTIP. Although only a procedural vote, the fact that Democrats in the Senate united to dismiss the motion makes it significantly less likely that Obama will succeed, with commentators saying Obama's trade strategy is now 'in tatters'.

Beyond the politics of fear

12 May 2015

The outcome of the 2015 election is that myopia, fear and scare tactics have triumphed over an outward looking, hopeful vision of what we could achieve in the world. To be sure there were moments of light: women dominating political debates and the promise that we stop haemorrhaging wealth on weapons of mass destruction.

Should aid money be used as a tool for expanding free markets?

27 April 2015

Ask a particularly extreme proponent of the free market how they see the future, and they might conjure up schools run by Coca-Cola and education programmes administered by Price Waterhouse Coopers. Or they might see hospitals operated as companies by nurse-entrepreneurs who compete for private equity funds. 

So TTIP won’t stop public services being run in the interests of ordinary people? Tell that to Argentina

16 April 2015

Another week, another victory for big business over a government in a secret pseudo-court. This time it’s the turn of private water giant Suez, who successfully sued Argentina for reversing the privatisation of Buenos Aires's water supply.