Nick Dearden

Nick Dearden, photo by Genevieve Stevenson




As director, Nick manages the staff team and resources on behalf of Global Justice Now's members. He is also the public face of the organisation. Nick started his career at War on Want where he became a senior campaigner. He went on to be corporates campaign manager at Amnesty International UK. As director of the Jubilee Debt Campaign, he built strong relationships with campaigners in the global south. He helped win a new law to stop Vulture Funds from using UK courts to squeeze huge debt payments out of poor countries. Nick joined Global Justice Now in September 2013.

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Latest posts

WDM members vote to change our name

13 October 2014

In September, members of the World Development Movement from around the country voted to change our name to Global Justice Now.

Letter to Vince Cable on CETA

09 September 2014

Re: The inclusion of ISDS in Canada trade agreement

In the city of revolutions

21 August 2014

Thirty activists from the UK, mostly from WDM groups, are in Paris for the Summer University of Attac – the global justice network founded two decades ago to fight the power of finance. 

Transnational capital is the real economic migrant

09 June 2014

By focussing purely on movement of people into the UK, the seven Labour MPs who wrote an open letter to Ed Miliband risk inflaming a dangerous discourse on immigration and race which 'blames the victim', and is anything but progressive.

Call this democracy?

22 May 2014

Today we choose who will represent us in the European Parliament. A lot of people are sceptical about European elections – the parliament still has few powers in an overwhelmingly undemocratic decision-making system driven by corporate interests.

Hypocrisy, blackmail and power politics: same old WTO

12 December 2013

The first global trade deal in 20 years has been a source of great celebration. The story goes that it’s a modest start but it’s got the World Trade Organization (WTO) back on track, maybe even adding US$1 trillion to the ailing global economy.