Malise Rosbech

Role

Supporter care and engagement assistant

Biography

Malise joined Global Justice Now in July 2015 as the supporter care and engagement assistant after a few years in the humanitarian sector. She also works as an editor and publisher for the feminist periodical, HYSTERIA, and has formerly been involved with The Women's Empowerment Project and the Feminist Library in London. Malise has a Master's degree in Contemporary Philosophy and Critical Theory and a Post-graduate Certificate in Development Studies. In her spare time she enjoys a bit of knitting next to her cat.

Latest posts

10 reasons you should join Global Justice Now at the Brighton Marathon 2017


28 December 2016

It’s that time of year again – the time for New Year’s resolutions. Here’s my 10 reasons why running the Brighton Marathon should be one of yours.

The future of our trade campaign: your thoughts


23 September 2016

The recent months have been somewhat of a rollercoaster for our trade campaign. Needless to say that with the likely failure of TTIP* and the ever more pressing threat of CETA**, our staff, activists, members and supporters have been very busy.

Ninety-Nine: The verdict is in


28 April 2016

Ninety-Nine: The verdict is in

The results from our supporter survey about our magazine, Ninety-Nine.

We recently asked you what you think of Ninety-Nine. We did this for one simple reason:  it’s your magazine. By listening to your feedback, we can improve the magazine and adapt it to what you’d like it to be.

Why TTIP is a feminist issue


25 February 2016

From online harassment to sex trafficking: nowadays most world problems seem to be ‘feminist issues’. And now trade deals too?

How two of our supporters (almost) inspired me to run a marathon


05 January 2016

“If I can just make it up that hill…” I thought, gasping for air on a cold January morning. I did make it to the top but it’s safe to say, I wasn’t very fit. I had struggled to run just 3k and in a few months I was going to participate in a 10k charity run. “I’ll never make New Year’s resolutions again”, I promised myself as I walked home.