Guy Taylor

Guy Taylor

Role

Trade campaigner

Biography

Guy joined Global Justice Now in November 2014 to focus on the campaign against TTIP. He previously worked for the Joint Council for the Welfare of immigrants and before that for anti-capitalist group Globalise Resistance. He has been tear gassed in nine different countries, has uncovered a police spy, and lives with his partner and young son in SE London.

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Latest posts

CETA: what happened in Strasbourg and what’s next


16 February 2017

Yesterday the European parliament passed CETA, the Canada-EU trade deal. After a fearsome campaign the vote was 408 in favour, 254 against with 33 abstentions. 209 MEPs did not turn up to vote.

Trade unions come out swinging against toxic EU trade deal with Canada


13 February 2017

Dear Labour MEPs, we write to ask you to oppose the ratification of Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), the EU-Canada  trade deal due to be voted on in the European parliament on February 15.

Ten reasons why the Canada-EU trade deal (CETA) must be stopped


17 November 2016

Here’s ten reasons why you should be seriously concerned about CETA, and why you might want to email your MEP about it.

CETA is back from the dead - but it's not over yet


31 October 2016

There was a huge amount of EU tub-thumping yesterday (30 October), as the EU and Canadian summit happened in a very rushed manner and the CETA* deal was signed by Justin Trudeau and Jean-Claude Juncker. The media have presented the signing as the end of the journey for CETA saying that it’s time for everyone to accept this trade deal as finalised.

Is CETA dead yet?


24 October 2016

Some have called a victory, others are expecting to hear some awful deal has been brokered. Either way CETA, the trade and investment deal between Canada and the EU, is in mortal danger.

TTIP may be dead, but we’re still facing TTIP by the back door


28 September 2016

The architects of the current wave of trade deals have embarked on a desperate ploy to salvage something from the death of their flagship treaty. Sacrificing the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership or TTIP in order to get CETA (the close relation of TTIP, a deal between the EU and Canada) agreed was always going to be a risky strategy.

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