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Not saving the world at COP 21

Over the last few months, attempts have been made to present COP 21, the ‘landmark’ Paris climate summit to be held in December as an opportunity to ‘save the world’. The people behind these appeals appear to believe that if only we had a big enough petition or an impressive enough march, the political elite might be persuaded to use the Paris COP to take serious action on climate change.

Resource thumbail

Power to the people?

November 2011

The La Mata and La Ventosa wind park in the state of Oaxaca is the World Bank’s flagship Clean Technology Fund (CTF) project in Mexico. The UK government has provided £385 million in capital to the CTF from its overseas aid budget, 14% of the CTF’s total funding.

We should learn from the experience of the failed structural adjustment policies of the 1980s and 1990s


19 October 2010

The experience of developing countries should be sounding alarm bells for us all. Austerity measures in the form of structural adjustment plans pushed by the IMF and World Bank in the 1980s and 1990s had devastating effects on the world’s poor. Poverty, inequality and injustice all increased massively as safety nets for the poorest where slashed in favour of big business.

 

In solidarity with campaigners in South Africa, WDM has joined a call to the UK government to say no to a World Bank proposal to provide a $3.75 billion loan to South African energy giant Eskom. The project, which Eskom want to use as an excuse to raise rates for people living in South Africa, would increase energy poverty and cause environmental destruction that would hit the poorest people in South Africa hardest.

One size for all: A study of IMF and World Bank Poverty Reduction Strategies

September 2005

In recent years the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank have adopted new ways of working and new rhetoric on ‘country ownership’ and ‘participation’. At the start of the 1980s, the two institutions began to make their loans and aid conditional on implementing ‘structural adjustment’ policies. The set of structural adjustment conditions, commonly referred to as the ‘Washington Consensus’, have been widely criticised both for undermining national political processes and causing widespread social and economic damage.

Treacherous conditions

May 2003

How IMF and World Bank policies tied to debt relief are undermining development

States of Unrest III

April 2003

This report documents protests in developing countries in 2002. The first States of Unrest report was released in September 2000. It charted protests between the WTO Ministerial in Seattle, in November 1999, and the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Annual Meetings in Prague, in September 2000. States of Unrest II was published in April 2002, charting protests during 2001.

States of Unrest II

April 2002

This report documents protests in developing countries in 2001. The first States of Unrest report was released in September 2000. It charted protests between the WTO Ministerial in Seattle, in November 1999, and the International Monetary Fund and World Bank Annual Meetings in Prague, in September 2000.

This report was followed by States of Unrest III.

States of Unrest: Resistance to IMF policies in poor countries

September 2000

Since Seattle 1999, the media has heralded the dawn of a new movement in Europe and America, epitomised by protests aimed at the WTO, IMF and the World Bank.
However, this 'new movement', portrayed by the media as students and anarchists from the rich and prosperous global north, is just the tip of the iceberg. In the global south, a far deeper and wide-ranging movement has been developing for years, largely ignored by the media.

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Not saving the world at COP 21

Over the last few months, attempts have been made to present COP 21, the ‘landmark’ Paris climate summit to be held in December as an opportunity to ‘save the world’. The people behind these appeals appear to believe that if only we had a big enough petition or an impressive enough march, the political elite might be persuaded to use the Paris COP to take serious action on climate change.

We should learn from the experience of the failed structural adjustment policies of the 1980s and 1990s


19 October 2010

The experience of developing countries should be sounding alarm bells for us all. Austerity measures in the form of structural adjustment plans pushed by the IMF and World Bank in the 1980s and 1990s had devastating effects on the world’s poor. Poverty, inequality and injustice all increased massively as safety nets for the poorest where slashed in favour of big business.

 

Resources

Resource thumbail

Power to the people?

November 2011

The La Mata and La Ventosa wind park in the state of Oaxaca is the World Bank’s flagship Clean Technology Fund (CTF) project in Mexico. The UK government has provided £385 million in capital to the CTF from its overseas aid budget, 14% of the CTF’s total funding.

One size for all: A study of IMF and World Bank Poverty Reduction Strategies

September 2005

In recent years the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank have adopted new ways of working and new rhetoric on ‘country ownership’ and ‘participation’. At the start of the 1980s, the two institutions began to make their loans and aid conditional on implementing ‘structural adjustment’ policies. The set of structural adjustment conditions, commonly referred to as the ‘Washington Consensus’, have been widely criticised both for undermining national political processes and causing widespread social and economic damage.

Treacherous conditions

May 2003

How IMF and World Bank policies tied to debt relief are undermining development

Latest news

In solidarity with campaigners in South Africa, WDM has joined a call to the UK government to say no to a World Bank proposal to provide a $3.75 billion loan to South African energy giant Eskom. The project, which Eskom want to use as an excuse to raise rates for people living in South Africa, would increase energy poverty and cause environmental destruction that would hit the poorest people in South Africa hardest.