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Research from social justice campaign organisation Global Justice Now has exposed the scandal of the 10 biggest corporations in the world making more money than most countries combined. 

In addition, research released today that focuses on Scotland shows that:

Responding to Jeremy Corbyn's speech on Brexit today, Nick Dearden the director of campaign group Global Justice Now said:

MPs have today voted in favour of a controversial bill that development campaigners say would effectively privatise huge amounts of the UK’s overseas aid budget.

The Commonwealth Development Corporation Bill will enable DfID to quadruple the amount of money it channels through its private equity arm, the CDC group, from £1.5 billion to £6 billion. The bill would also allow the limit to raise to £12 billion without the need for further primary regulation.

MPs are set to vote tomorrow on a controversial bill that development campaigners say would effectively privatise huge amounts of the UK’s overseas aid budget. The Commonwealth Development Corporation Bill would enable DfID to quadruple the amount of money it channels through its private equity arm, the CDC group, from £1.5 billion to £6 billion.. The bill would also allow the limit to raise to £12 billion without the need for further primary regulation.

The new report, published by Global Justice Now and the New Economics Foundation, argues that coming out of CAP after Brexit presents an opportunity to overhaul the system of subsidies in a way that not only saves the taxpayer £1.1 billion, but also ensures that public money is used for public goods like fighting climate change, restoring the environment, revitalising local economies and creating new jobs in the UK food system.

Responding to Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom's speech at the Oxford Farming Conference on 'Ambition for food and farming industry', NIck Dearden the director of Global Justice Now said:

Aid campaigners have accused DfID and the government of ‘inviting scandal’ by trying to divert billions of pounds more of UK aid money through its private equity arm despite repeated criticisms that it hasn’t been able to demonstrate its development impact. The accusations are made in a new briefing that has been submitted to members of the Bill Committee who are currently considering the government plans.

This confirms our fears that Britain’s post-Brexit foreign policy will be modelled on putting the narrow self-interest of big business ahead of decent jobs, human rights, environmental protection or building a fair society here in Britain. The delusions of empire on which the government is basing its rhetoric is simply disguising the fact that most people in Britain didn’t vote for policies like this.

A new briefing outlines a gradually emerging picture of what kind of policies the current government is likely to pursue in a post-Brexit world, gleaned from a series of speeches, interviews and meetings of senior political and military figures.
 

These shocking allegations against one of DFID’s biggest private contractors is the latest piece of evidence against the current drive to outsource more of the aid budget to expensive consultants in the UK rather than to address conditions of structural poverty and inequality in countries where it is needed.


Last night activists obliterated the words ‘democracy’, ‘environment’ and ‘justice’ with gold spray paint outside the offices of a Canadian mining company, in a protest designed to draw attention to the corporate court system being proposed under the EU-Canada trade deal, CETA.

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