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Stop the corporate takeover of Africa’s food
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Africa is producing more and more food. Why is hunger rising?

Huge corporations are scrambling to take control of Africa’s food at the expense of the small-scale farmers who feed most of the continent.

>>> Find out why

Small-scale farmers are fighting to win back control

Via the international movement for food sovereignty, small-scale farmers are fighting to keep control of their land and seeds, produce food sustainably and prioritise food for local populations over exports

>>> Find out how

Take action: Stop the Monsanto law

Ghana is passing a law because of pressure from rich governments and corporations

Stand with small-scale farmers in Nigeria

Resist the corporate land grab by Dominion Farms - tell their CEO to pull out

Latest Posts

A clarion call from Mali - agroecology, not agribusiness!


04 March 2015

The International Agroecology Forum, which took place at the Nyéléni Centre in Mali last week, brought together a huge array of delegates ranging from peasants, family farmers, indigenous peoples, NGOs and academics to discuss how agroecology can help build an ecologically and socially just food system.

Seeds, solidarity and synergy: A visit from Samia Nkrumah


25 February 2015

When we found that Food Sovereignty Ghana had elected to send Samia Nkrumah to represent them at Take Back Our World, I was aware that it was a bit of a scoop.

Fighting for Food Sovereignty


15 January 2015

Over the last few years I have travelled to a number of countries including Ethiopia, Venezuela and Indonesia to meet activists from around the world who are fighting for food sovereignty.

Latest news

Despite international trade rules being rigged in favour of industrial agriculture, small scale farmers are the key to addressing food issues across African countries, according to a report being released on Wednesday. Small scale farmers produce over 70% of the food consumed in Africa, on less than 15% of the agricultural land. But donors, development agencies and multilateral financial initiatives, like the DfID-backed ‘New Alliance for Food Security’ continue to push a one-size-fits-all industrial model of agriculture that threatens the livelihoods of small farmers.

Ninety NGOs and campaign groups have condemned the G7’s New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition, as representatives of governments and multinational companies, including UK development secretary Justine Greening, meet in New York today to discuss the controversial scheme.