Climate and energy


Energy injustice is destroying people's lives
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We live in an era of energy injustice

The corporate grip over energy keeps 1.3 billion people without access to electricity. And energy privatisation, supported by the UK government in countries like Nigeria, is putting equitable energy access even further out of reach.

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Power to the people

To ensure everyone has access to energy and tackle climate change, we need to take control of energy from big business and finance, and we need to stop UK aid money being used for energy privatisation.

>>> Find out how

System change, not climate change

Join us in fighting against the corporate-controlled climate negotiations in Paris

Take action against energy privatisation in Nigeria

Ask development minister Grant Shapps to stop wasting UK aid money

Latest posts

Five things to look forward at the Paris COP

We’ve always argued that we need to look beyond the negotiations towards building a stronger grassroots movement against climate change. It is not the conference outcome that is important, it’s the chance to add to this movement and take part in some of the important and useful events organised over the two weeks in Paris. Below are a few of the things that we’re looking forward to.

The Paris attacks make climate protests more important than ever

18 November 2015

It will be deeply ironic if climate activists from around the world are among the first to fall foul of France's emergency powers. Of course, those campaigners have nothing to do with the brutal attacks on Paris last Friday night. On the contrary, they will challenge the unequal, unsustainable and militaristic policies on which terrorism has thrived.

The elephant in Paris – guns and greenhouse gases

13 November 2015

There is no shortage of words in the latest negotiating document for the UN climate negotiations taking place in Paris at the end of November – 32,731 words to be precise and counting. Yet strangely there is one word you won’t find: military. It’s a strange omission, given that the US military alone is the single largest user of petroleum in the world and has been the main enforcer of the global oil economy for decades.

Latest news

An international coalition of NGOs, civil society groups and political figures such as Naomi Klein and Susan George have called on the French president to lift the ban on protests during the COP 21 climate talks in Paris, which is due to start on the 30 November.

The UK government has published a statement today that highlights the fierce opposition to British company GCM Resources’ plans for a massive open cast coal mine in Phulbari, north-west Bangladesh. The statement notes protestors “calling strikes, blockading roads and occupying the company’s local offices”.

Activists will today unfurl a giant banner at the London headquarters of UK listed mining company BHP Billiton in protest against the company’s plans to build a series of coal mines in some of the last remaining stands of primary rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. A petition will be formally presented to company management at 1pm.


"The Road Through Paris" climate justice newspaper

November 2015

We all want action on climate change, but what does that action mean? Will it be effective, will it be fair, and are the Paris climate talks going to deliver that action?

Why we are campaigning on energy privatisation, and other questions

August 2015

Despite the UK’s long and unsuccessful experience with energy privatisation, our government continues to support it elsewhere – most recently in Nigeria. The UK continues to pour aid money into a privatisation programme that seems doomed to failure, neglecting policy options that could address Nigeria’s serious energy supply problems.

Here are some commonly asked questions about our campaign on energy privatisation.

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COP out - why Paris won’t deliver and what we need instead

August 2015

Climate change is already hitting the world’s poorest people hardest and it needs to be stopped. The responsibility for the climate crisis lies squarely on the shoulders of the rich, whose consumption and greed has driven us to the brink of disaster. This makes it a problem of social and economic justice.