Climate and energy


Energy injustice is destroying people's lives
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We live in an era of energy injustice

The corporate grip over energy keeps 1.3 billion people without access to electricity. And energy privatisation, supported by the UK government in countries like Nigeria, is putting equitable energy access even further out of reach.

>>> Find out more

Power to the people

To ensure everyone has access to energy and tackle climate change, we need to take control of energy from big business and finance, and we need to stop UK aid money being used for energy privatisation.

>>> Find out how

Take action against energy privatisation in Nigeria

Ask development minister Grant Shapps to stop wasting UK aid money

System change, not climate change

Join us in fighting against the corporate-controlled climate negotiations in Paris

Latest posts

Lisa Nandy’s vision of energy democracy isn’t idealism – it’s already starting to happen

29 September 2015

A bold and refreshing vision for the UK’s energy future was spelled out this morning by Lisa Nandy, the Shadow Energy and Climate Change Secretary, at the Labour party conference. It wasn’t only about her commitment to clean energy -  she spoke of Labour’s plans to “democratise [energy]” in Britain, by putting “people back in charge”. 

Is COP21 a con?

22 September 2015

Given past experience of UN climate talks, it's unrealistic to expect the talks in Paris this December to deliver what's needed to stop runaway climate change. But that needn't stop us asking some searching questions about what we need to do here in the UK to make a difference.

How we are tackling climate change by taking over the British Museum

You might think that the British Museum is a strange place for climate activists to focus some of their energies, but today myself and numerous different groups are carrying out a series of creative interventions in various parts of the building because British Museum is endorsing what BP (and other fossil companies) are doing to prevent meaningful action on climate change.

Latest news

The UK government has published a statement today that highlights the fierce opposition to British company GCM Resources’ plans for a massive open cast coal mine in Phulbari, north-west Bangladesh. The statement notes protestors “calling strikes, blockading roads and occupying the company’s local offices”.

Activists will today unfurl a giant banner at the London headquarters of UK listed mining company BHP Billiton in protest against the company’s plans to build a series of coal mines in some of the last remaining stands of primary rainforest in Indonesian Borneo. A petition will be formally presented to company management at 1pm.

Following years of pressure and protests from campaigners, account holders and impacted community members, Barclays have released a policy position statement on Mountain Top Removal (MTR) coal mining in which they state, “Provision of financial support to companies which are significant producers of MTR sourced coal will be agreed by exception only.”


Why we are campaigning on energy privatisation, and other questions

August 2015

Despite the UK’s long and unsuccessful experience with energy privatisation, our government continues to support it elsewhere – most recently in Nigeria. The UK continues to pour aid money into a privatisation programme that seems doomed to failure, neglecting policy options that could address Nigeria’s serious energy supply problems.

Here are some commonly asked questions about our campaign on energy privatisation.

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COP out - why Paris won’t deliver and what we need instead

August 2015

Climate change is already hitting the world’s poorest people hardest and it needs to be stopped. The responsibility for the climate crisis lies squarely on the shoulders of the rich, whose consumption and greed has driven us to the brink of disaster. This makes it a problem of social and economic justice.

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Privatising power: UK aid funds energy privatisation in Nigeria

March 2015

Despite its vast oil wealth, over half of Nigerians lack access to electricity, and the country’s grid power usage per person is among the lowest in the world, meaning that many people rely on candles and kerosene, or expensive diesel generators. Lack of electricity hampers the provision of public services like healthcare and education, and makes it difficult or impossible for businesses to operate efficiently. As a result, Nigeria relies on imports for most of its manufactured goods. So it is clear that change is urgently needed to Nigeria’s energy system.