Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects. Views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of Global Justice Now. 

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from energy justice, climate change and the WTO, to TTIP, food sovereignty and aid.

If you've got something to say and are interested in blogging for us, please get in touch with Morten.

Latest posts

Coca-Cola's investment in Africa is not about solving hunger


06 August 2014

Yesterday, Coca Cola announced it would expand its business activities in Africa. The corporate giant announced it will increase investments in Africa by $5 billion over the next 6 years, bringing the total to $17 billion by 2020. Coca Cola is part of the latest wave of corporations moving in to Africa to secure markets, land, resources and labour which promise vast corporate profits. 

 

Aviation biofuels: debunking the greenwash

The aviation industry insists that its use of biofuels, made from plants and blended with conventional jet fuels, is ‘sustainable’. Rose Bridger begs to differ

Youths: Feeding the Future of Farming


17 July 2014

Ele Saltmarsh writes about the challenges and opportunities facing aspiring young farmers in the UK.

 

Biodiversity offsetting: Making dreams come true

Biodiversity offsetting makes dreams come true.  As our new mockumentary shows, it is the license that can make bad developers’ dreams a reality.

Infrastructure – who benefits?


26 June 2014

Today, investment from multinational companies and aid money from rich countries are joining forces once more to extract Africa's wealth. Colonial history repeating? Find out more in Heidi's blog.

 

Victory for campaign against airport in Aranmula

An epic campaign against construction of an airport on paddy fields, used for growing rice, in Aranmula, Kerala has achieved a monumental victory. 

Joining a major social justice gathering in Paris this summer


16 June 2014

On 12 July, WDM will be part of a day of action against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). This proposed agreement, between the US and the EU, is more accurately described as a corporate power grab by big business on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Colombian mining locomotive: in whose benefit?


13 June 2014

The day I arrived in Colombia was the day of the first round of the country’s presidential elections. Across the country, a little more than a third of the people voted. None of the candidates reached the required 50 per cent of the total vote, meaning that another round of voting is due to take place this weekend, with voters choosing between the top two candidates. Colombian people I have spoken to have said there is little between the candidates, and that most people do not feel represented by any of the parties standing.

Transnational capital is the real economic migrant


09 June 2014

By focussing purely on movement of people into the UK, the seven Labour MPs who wrote an open letter to Ed Miliband risk inflaming a dangerous discourse on immigration and race which 'blames the victim', and is anything but progressive.

10 reasons why you should be worried about TTIP


06 June 2014
  1. TTIP IS A THREAT TO DEMOCRACY
    If agreed, TTIP would give corporations the power to sue governments over decisions that could harm their future profits, undermining democratic decision-making made in the public interest.
     
  2. TTIP IS A THREAT TO PUBLIC SERVICES

Interview: Scotland’s place in building a just world


30 May 2014

Hear from two prominent Scottish politicians on their vision for the future of Scotland as Scottish people prepare to vote in the independence referendum

HSBC: Be a no-coal bank!

Judging by the scarcity of journalists at the AGM of ‘local bank’ HSBC this morning, the bank seems to be doing slightly better in the public image stakes than some of its competitors. Yet HSBC pours more money into fossil fuels than any other UK bank.

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