Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects.

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from energy justice, climate change and the WTO, to TTIP, food sovereignty and aid.

If you've got something to say and are interested in blogging for us, please get in touch with Morten.

Latest posts

BP and the greenest Olympic Games ever?


17 February 2012

The World Development Movement has signed an open letter sent today to the organisers of London 2012, asking them to reconsider the games’ sponsorship deal with BP.

Five great social movement posters from the walls of the WDM office


13 February 2012

If you've ever been to the World Development Movement's offices in South London, you'll know that our walls are covered in posters from various demonstrations, events and social movement struggles around the world. Earlier today I went around the office and photographed five of my favourites.


How to become a better citizen through dodging tax, causing hunger and financing climate change


10 February 2012

In his speech to the inaugural BBC Today business lecture in November last year, Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond argued that banks needed to rebuild the trust they had lost with the public. Bankers need to ‘become better citizens’, he said.


Do you agree that we need tax justice? Listen to Taxcast


08 February 2012

The Tax Justice Network has launched a new 15 minute monthly podcast service with the latest news, research and analysis of events in tax evasion, tax avoidance and the shadow banking system. TAXCAST producer Naomi Fowler explains why it's so important.


Aid is meant to alleviate poverty, not to help sell fighter jets


02 February 2012

The news that the Indian government might choose to buy French fighter jets instead of British Typhoon jets should have nothing to do with the UK’s development aid. But thanks to comments from development minister Andrew Mitchell, aid has become entangled in the media story about the arms trade.


Challenge the broken banking system by moving your money


31 January 2012

Guest post by James Angel, used to be campaigns and policy intern

Remember 2008? After decades of unchecked greed and corruption, the neoliberal house of cards finally toppled over, leaving us with the worst economic crisis since the great depression. The big banks have been gambling with our money for years but, as we all know, the costs of the crisis – the unemployment, the lost homes, the austerity measures – have been borne by us. 

The state of corporate power 2012


27 January 2012

Yesterday David Cameron took the stage in Davos yesterday to push his outdated agenda of deregulation, liberalisation and slashing of workers right as the solution to the world’s problems, to the applause of the gathered representatives of the world’s 1 per cent. Meanwhile, the Transnational Institute published a set of infographics that tell a completely different story. 

Durban Platform: Using broken ideas to fix the climate crisis


25 January 2012

The Durban UN climate talks saw a repetition of the pattern of injustice and inaction of previous climate talks, with rich countries protecting their own interests and those of multinational industries over those of people.

Shame on Barclays, shame on corporate power


11 January 2012

Guest post by James Angel, used to be campaigns intern

Fuel Poverty Action ‘die-in’ at EDF against fuel poverty deaths


20 December 2011

Guest post by James Angel, used to be campaigns and policy intern

As climate justice activists, when we think about our global economy’s addiction to fossil fuels, we quite rightly focus on the 300,000 in the global south that are killed by climate change every year. But our addiction to fossil fuels is also killing thousands of people in the UK through fuel poverty. Between 2010 and 2011, there were 25,700 ‘excess winter deaths’ in the UK, this statistic demarcating the extra people that died in the winter in comparison to other seasons. Of these deaths we can be sure that, at the very least, 10 per cent were directly attributable to the fact that people cannot afford to heat their homes.

We need more support for grassroots social movements, not scepticism


20 December 2011

I often read Duncan Green’s, Oxfam’s Head of Research, thoughtful blog, From Poverty to Power. Sometimes I agree with his views, sometimes I don’t.

Though of course we are colleagues in international development, the World Development Movement’s views can occasionally diverge from that of Oxfam’s. We are far more cautious when it comes to the role of markets, for example, and our tactics towards achieving change are undoubtedly, shall we say, more bold. I can’t quite imagine Oxfam commissioning The Real George Osborne or driving a tank through the City of London. But these are healthy differences that in the end make for an exciting and diverse sector. 

Who are you and what do you want? – The results from our supporter survey.


09 December 2011

Over the summer we asked you to fill in our supporter survey to let us know a bit more about yourself and what you think of WDM and our campaigns. A big thank you to the over 1100 of you who responded! The results have been really interesting and will be invaluable in helping us improve our campaigns and communications.

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