Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects. Views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of Global Justice Now. 

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from energy justice, climate change and the WTO, to TTIP, food sovereignty and aid.

Latest posts

It’s time to radically reduce inequality


31 October 2014

Last night I was defending the proposition that wealth needs to be aggressively reduced, alongside Jeremy Corbyn MP and Adam Swift at Warwick University.

This is more or less what I said: 

Fighting energy injustice at home

As part of the new phase of our climate and energy justice campaign, we’re looking at ways to make the links with struggles against corporate control of energy at home. Earlier this week, we attended the launch of Fuel Poverty Action's Energy Bill of Rights in parliament.

UK banks prominent in new coal financers global hall of shame

For two years now, we have exposed the dirty fossil fuel secrets of the major UK banks. We’ve shown how big banks plough billions of pounds into coal, oil and gas, threatening dangerous climate change. We’ve also exposed the terrible things some of the big coal mining companies they fund are doing in the name of corporate profit.

TTIP Update 4


29 October 2014

Update number four on the latest in the fight against TTIP, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership

MPs back our call for action on ‘unethical’ mining industry

Today, a parliamentary committee has released its verdict on the future of the mining and extractive industry.

It's Philip Morris vs Uruguayan lungs, so why would governments be on #TeamPhilipMorris?


23 October 2014

You’re the government of a small South American country with a modest-sized health budget and you want to do what you can to encourage citizens to lead healthier, longer lives by dissuading them to give up smoking.

Is UCL At BHP Billiton's Beck And Call?

Yesterday, at the last minute, University College London (UCL) cancelled an event about BHP Billiton in Colombia due to be held this evening. Why?

Thousands urge European Commission to ditch biodiversity offsetting


17 October 2014

As the European Commission concludes its consultation on biodiversity offsetting, almost 10,000 people and nearly 60 organisations (including us) have signed a letter urging the Commission not to pursue policy related to biodiversity offsetting (BO). They fear it would “harm nature and people, and give power to those who destroy nature for private profit.”

Is the incoming European president planning on removing ISDS from the EU-USA trade deal?


17 October 2014

Dutch journalist Caroline de Gruyter, writing for NRC Handelsblad reported that incoming European Commission president Jean Claude Juncker is said to have decided to remove the controversial investor-to-state dispute settlement (ISDS) from TTIP, citing that it is “too late” to win on the issue, and to send a clear signal to EU citizens that he has “heard them."

It’s world food day, so let’s remember the small-scale farmers that feed most of the world


16 October 2014

All over the world small-scale food producers are growing food sustainably for their local communities in spite of the threats thrown at them by the world’s elite and powerful. 

Z is for Zai pits


14 October 2014

The Zai pit technique originated in Mali but was adopted and modified by farmers in Burkina Faso after a particularly bad drought in 1980 which affected over 1 million people. The technique involves digging a series of pits roughly 20-40cm across by 20cm deep during the dry season. Manure is added to the pit and when the first rains arrive the pits are planted with seeds.

Y is for yield


13 October 2014

People generally understand and like the idea of sustainable agriculture - producing food without expensive and unsustainable inputs like chemical fertilisers and pesticides. But many people argue that sustainable agriculture can’t produce as much food as conventional agriculture, and with our increasing global population, we need to increase food production as much as possible.

Pages