Blog

Get the latest news and analysis on global justice issues and join in the debate. Our bloggers include Global Justice Now staff as well as activists from around the world who work on a broad range of subjects. Views expressed by guest bloggers do not necessarily represent the views of Global Justice Now. 

Our blog links experiences in the UK to issues affecting people globally, and covers everything from energy justice, climate change and the WTO, to TTIP, food sovereignty and aid.

Latest posts

Why we're asking Marks & Spencer to stop funding hate


27 February 2017

Today we're launching a new campaign, inspired by, and with the blessing of Stop Funding Hate. Here's why we decided to take action, and how you can get involved to stop the climate of hate towards migrant and refugees.

Four months to #StopGlyphosate


23 February 2017

Earlier this month, Corporate Europe Observatory joined a broad pan-European coalition in launching a European Citizens Initiative (ECI) to ban glyphosate and improve the weak EU pesticides approval procedure.

The long, hard fight against food speculation


23 February 2017

It has been almost a decade since the global financial crisis where financial traders and banks played fast and hard with excessive risk and burnt the global economy. The global price of food was not off-limits and food prices rocketed with excessive levels of speculation on the commodities markets, leaving worsening global hunger in its wake.

Have Paul Nuttall or other UKIP politicians lied to you about trade deals?


22 February 2017

UKIP have been making all sorts of headlines for lies recently, mainly around leader Paul Nuttall’s fabrications about being part of the Hillsborough disaster. It’s pretty despicable that anyone would try to use such a huge personal tragedy for their own gain, let alone lie about it. But there’s another series of UKIP lies that took place recently that you might not have heard about.

A teaser: TISA, Trump and the security industry


21 February 2017

Question: What’s the connection between US President Donald Trump, GEO group – the private prison operator that runs Dungavel immigration centre, and TISA, the super-privatisation global trade deal?

CETA: what happened in Strasbourg and what’s next


16 February 2017

Yesterday the European parliament passed CETA, the Canada-EU trade deal. After a fearsome campaign the vote was 408 in favour, 254 against with 33 abstentions. 209 MEPs did not turn up to vote.

We lost today's battle on CETA, but we can still win the war


15 February 2017

Today the European parliament voted yes to CETA, the undemocratic trade deal between Canada and the EU. 27 British MEPs voted in favour of it, although 22 did reject it.

Trade unions come out swinging against toxic EU trade deal with Canada


13 February 2017

Dear Labour MEPs, we write to ask you to oppose the ratification of Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), the EU-Canada  trade deal due to be voted on in the European parliament on February 15.

CETA isn’t about siding with Trudeau against Trump


10 February 2017

With the European parliament’s vote on CETA coming up next week, the European Attac network, of which Global Justice Now is a part, has been working hard to persuade undecided centre-left MEPs across the EU to reject the deal.

Is corporate greed killing modern medicine? Animals, drugs and superbugs


09 February 2017

Imagine a world where a small cut could kill you or where treatments such as chemotherapy or caesarean sections would be too dangerous to perform. That could be our all-too-near-future if we don't take action.

Secret CETA vote - a cut in the dark that won't stop bleeding


07 February 2017

The Government has ushered in the controversial EU-Canada free trade agreement the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement CETA under the cloak of darkness amidst serious concerns on human rights, public health and rule of law. 

Brexit White Paper – does it meet our Red Lines?


06 February 2017

Last week the government released their White Paper on Bexit. Despite stretching to 77 pages, it gives little concrete detail on how the government will go about this most massive of constitutional changes.

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