What's the carbon footprint of your bank account?


10 September 2013

What do you think your annual carbon footprint might be?  Maybe around the UK average of 8-9 tonnes. But what if you took into account the emissions resulting from the investments of the bank where your money is? That would give quite a different picture...

If you’re an RBS customer it would give the picture shown (we could have also done this calculation for other high street banks like HSBC, Lloyds and Barclays, who also invest heavily in fossil fuels, and probably come up with similarly striking results).

If this picture shocks you, why not have a go at our mini-quiz and see whether you can guess how many times greater the emissions resulting from RBS’s loans to fossil fuel companies are than the entire emissions of Scotland, where the bank is headquartered. 

Or come on our 'Scandalous Edinburgh plc' walking tour where we'll really be bringing our Carbon Capital campaign to life with humour, real life stories and more eye opening facts.  Click here to book your ticket and prepare to be scandalised.

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