WDM tell HSBC: stop funding coal


22 October 2013

This morning, as part of a global day of action against coal, we went up to HSBC’s head office in Canary Wharf to tell them to stop pouring ordinary people’s money into coal projects around the world. Having set up an extraction site outside the bank, we then went to deliver money bags full of coal – as this is what ordinary people’s money becomes in the hands of HSBC. 

 

Money bags of coal that we handed in to HSBC

 

[video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wss2cWtotSk width:500]

  WDM director Nick Dearden explains why we were there.

 

 [video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMYLmYpVVgA width:500]

…and then we went to deliver HSBC some coal.

 

 [video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xjWGM8-kjJw width:500]

 Climate campaigner Kirsty explains why we’ve set up an extraction site outside HSBCs office.

Read our press release here and our briefing on why we are asking HSBC to stop lending to coal projects. 

The global day of action on coal is part of a month of action on dirty energy www.reclaimpower.net. As part of this, WDM is organising a speaker tour with Yasmin Romero Epiayu from Colombia, and Hendrik Siregar from the JATAM network  in Indonesia. Both of these activists are opposing coal mining in their countries that has been bankrolled by the UK finance sector. Check out the dates for the speaker tour here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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