HSBC's climate criminality

10 October 2013

Today, on the eve of Dirty Energy Month, we descended upon a branch of HSBC in the heart of the Square Mile. We cordoned off an area outside the bank with climate criminal hazard tape and informed curious passers-by of the bank’s investments in fossil fuel projects the world over.

We drew particular attention to coal mining in Kalimantan, Indonesia, which has destroyed communities and poisoned the local environment, all for a source of energy that is furthering us towards climate catastrophe.

We tried to hand in a cheque for 7p to ‘compensate’ HSBC for our occupation of 14 square meters of land in front of their branch – the same rate of half a penny per square metre the mining company BHP Billiton gave to local communities as compensation for taking their customary land in the Borneo rainforest. HSBC has helped BHP Billiton has raised over £1.8 billion in bond issues since 2009.

This series of videos illustrates our purpose and how’s the day’s action unfolded, including the surprise closure of the branch. Enjoy.

If you would like to organise a similar action at an HSBC near you, contact for a stunt pack. For more information about our Carbon Capital campaign visit:





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