Getting ready for WDM in Newcastle


16 July 2013

I have just booked my train tickets to Newcastle for 8 August. I’m very excited about this, not only because Newcastle is one of my favourite cities, but because I’ll be travelling up for the launch of a new World Development Movement group in Newcastle. 

At our conference in Leeds earlier this year, Not the G8: a real agenda for global justice, I met a group of people interested in campaigning on economic justice issues in Newcastle. After a chat about ideas for things we could do, we decided to give it a go. We’re kicking off the group with a film screening of the film: Growing Change, a journey into Venezuela’s food revolution and a discussion about the World Development Movement’s work on food issues, and what we can do locally.

Launch of Newcastle WDM

When: Thursday 8 August, 7pm (refreshments from 6.30pm)
Where: Tilley's bar, 105 Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 4AG

WDM has over 50 groups across the UK who tirelessly lobby politicians, organise creative actions, hold film screenings and talks and are building the movement for economic justice. What the new group in Newcastle does is up to the people who come along and get involved.

What you can do:

  • If you’re in Newcastle, come along on 8 August and find out more about WDM’s current work on food issues and help shape future campaigning in Newcastle.
  • If you’re not from Newcastle, help spread the word – share the event details with your friends and colleagues, by email and through facebook and twitter.
  • If you’re interested but can’t make it on the day, let us know by emailing activism@wdm.org.uk or calling Sarah at 020 7820 4900.

Whether it’s getting Barclays, the UK’s biggest player in food speculation, to announce it will no longer trade in food for speculative purposes; or getting the French oil company Total to postpone its plans to mine tar sands deposits in one of the poorest regions of Madagascar, none of WDM’s campaigns would have been won without local campaigning.

The bigger our network, the louder our voice for change, and the stronger the movement for a better world will be. 

WDM campaigners at a food sovereignty action on steps in Edinburgh

Edinburgh and Lothians WDM at their food sovereignty action.

 

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