Santas deliver pile of coal to HSBC


17 December 2013

Today 25 "climate justice Santas" delivered a tonne of coal to HSBC in Moorgate - which reacted by shutting its doors.

WDM’s Christmas present to HSBC wasn’t quite what the bank asked for... although they did have it coming. It came in the shape of more than 8000 pieces of coal delivered straight to their doorsteps and supplied with a healthy dose of Christmas carols with names like Frosty the Banker, Old King Coal, and Deck the Halls with Dirty Money.

You can see pictures, video, and tweets from the action here.

The present, delivered by Father Christmas on a dumper truck, is in line with the tradition of getting a piece of coal for Christmas if you behave badly. The fact that HSBC got a tonne of coal reflects HSBC’s bad behaviour very well.

•    HSBC is one of the biggest bankrollers of dirty energy around the world
•    HSBC financed coal to the tune of £3.8 billion between 2005 and 2011
•    HSBC underwrote about £75 billion in share and bond issues to fossil fuel companies between 2010 and 2012.

See more in our briefing on HSBC.

More than 8000 thousand people have already asked us to deliver a piece of coal to them on their behalf. You can join them here.

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