Rev Billy takes HSBC by Surprise


08 August 2013

Take a look at this video of Rev Billy when he came to London with his Stop Shopping Choir and protested inside a London branch of HSBC. The protest was inspired by information WDM had gathered on how the bank has been funding climate change, including projects such as the Cerrejόn mine in Colombia, which is the largest open pit coal mine in Latin America. The video shows protesters preparing for the stunt in a nearby park and then later on entering the bank to carry out the performance based around endangered species that have been negatively impacted by climate change.  


[video:http://vimeo.com/71220299 width:500 height:375 align:center]


We want HSBC to be more transparent on how it is contributing to climate change and report the amount of emissions that they are helping to finance across the globe. We have created a short form that you can use to email HSBC boss Brian Robertson and ask him to pledge that the bank will report on the global emissions that they are investing in. Just click here to access the form and take action. 

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Reclaiming Democracy: Say the Unsayable!


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This weekend at Take Back Our World festival in Devon, I spoke alongside two inspiring activists, one from London, one from Barcelona. The theme of our session was Radical Democracy- and amongst many other things, we all agreed that democracy is in crisis. 

Cerrejon coal in Colombia: rehabilitating the land, removing the humans


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Last month, Global Justice Now and Colombia Solidarity Campaign (both of them member groups of London Mining Network) supported me to take part in a delegation to La Guajira in Colombia, visiting communities affected by the massive Cerrejon coal mine.  Cerrejon is the largest opencast m

Developing countries recognise that the global trade system is broken, Brexit is the UK’s moment to do the same


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